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Cases of multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children continue to rise

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As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to decline, there’s growing concern about another condition that’s on the rise. It’s called multisystem inflammatory syndrome and it’s still a risk among children who also contract COVID-19. Most doctors will tell you we’re not out of the woods yet with COVID-19. While it’s encouraging to see case numbers and hospitalizations going down, doctors at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, are seeing cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome go up. It’s a syndrome that takes hold after recovering from COVID-19.“You can still develop this huge inflammatory response, you know, a few weeks later,” Children’s Mercy Hospital Dr. Angela Myers said. “Which can affect the liver, the heart, the lungs, the kidneys, develop a rash and high spiking fevers,” Myers said the syndrome didn’t seem to be a problem with the delta variant, but omicron is different. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome cases have again risen to what they were before there was any vaccine available.“Even though a young child might not have significant symptoms with a COVID-19 infection, they are at risk for developing this multisystem inflammatory syndrome later,” Myers said. That’s why doctors are pushing for more children to get vaccinated and to keep COVID-19 prevention methods in place.Children under the age of 5 could be eligible to receive Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine by the end of the month if Food and Drug Administration regulators give the OK.So far, 22% of elementary-aged kids are fully vaccinated. That’s compared to a little more than half of 12 to 17-year-olds.Watch the video above for the full story.

As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to decline, there’s growing concern about another condition that’s on the rise. It’s called multisystem inflammatory syndrome and it’s still a risk among children who also contract COVID-19.

Most doctors will tell you we’re not out of the woods yet with COVID-19. While it’s encouraging to see case numbers and hospitalizations going down, doctors at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, are seeing cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome go up. It’s a syndrome that takes hold after recovering from COVID-19.

“You can still develop this huge inflammatory response, you know, a few weeks later,” Children’s Mercy Hospital Dr. Angela Myers said. “Which can affect the liver, the heart, the lungs, the kidneys, develop a rash and high spiking fevers,”

Myers said the syndrome didn’t seem to be a problem with the delta variant, but omicron is different. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome cases have again risen to what they were before there was any vaccine available.

“Even though a young child might not have significant symptoms with a COVID-19 infection, they are at risk for developing this multisystem inflammatory syndrome later,” Myers said.

That’s why doctors are pushing for more children to get vaccinated and to keep COVID-19 prevention methods in place.

Children under the age of 5 could be eligible to receive Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine by the end of the month if Food and Drug Administration regulators give the OK.

So far, 22% of elementary-aged kids are fully vaccinated. That’s compared to a little more than half of 12 to 17-year-olds.

Watch the video above for the full story.



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