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Crumbling patches of pavement shows the need for repairs on I-20 in Jackson

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When driving along parts of I-20, you can see cracks and crumbles in the road.”It’s real tough. You can tell when you’re going over the road. It’s a lot of bumping and stuff like that,” said Jquan Mayes.This is due to a type of pavement known as OGFC, or open grated friction course.”It’s a huge benefit because it actually reduces the potential for hydroplaning, and it also reduces spray from traffic, but it’s like any other pavement type, and over time, it’s subject to oxidation and cracking,” said Micheal Flood, public information officer for MDOT.This cracking does not just happen on its own. Factors such as cold weather and rain can also contribute to deteriorating the pavement.”Rainfall is the culprit for a lot of this. If you see crumbling pavement, it’s likely a result of sustained extended rainfall and cold temperatures, among other things,” Flood said.According to MDOT, plans have been made to replace the weathered pavement and roads through an upcoming project this summer.”We’ve got a project in place to bid out in June of this year that will cover Interstate 20. That will remove the top layer of OGFC of Interstate 20 from Highway 18, all the way to the stack in Jackson,” Flood said.In the meantime, MDOT said the roads are still safe to travel on.”Where it does become a danger, we would obviously have to close that lane down. Keep an eye out for crews. Whenever we start the OGFC repairs as well, we’ll be putting out traffic alerts about it,” Flood said.MDOT said they want drivers to do their part and be alert on the interstate.

When driving along parts of I-20, you can see cracks and crumbles in the road.

“It’s real tough. You can tell when you’re going over the road. It’s a lot of bumping and stuff like that,” said Jquan Mayes.

This is due to a type of pavement known as OGFC, or open grated friction course.

“It’s a huge benefit because it actually reduces the potential for hydroplaning, and it also reduces spray from traffic, but it’s like any other pavement type, and over time, it’s subject to oxidation and cracking,” said Micheal Flood, public information officer for MDOT.

This cracking does not just happen on its own. Factors such as cold weather and rain can also contribute to deteriorating the pavement.

“Rainfall is the culprit for a lot of this. If you see crumbling pavement, it’s likely a result of sustained extended rainfall and cold temperatures, among other things,” Flood said.

According to MDOT, plans have been made to replace the weathered pavement and roads through an upcoming project this summer.

“We’ve got a project in place to bid out in June of this year that will cover Interstate 20. That will remove the top layer of OGFC of Interstate 20 from Highway 18, all the way to the stack in Jackson,” Flood said.

In the meantime, MDOT said the roads are still safe to travel on.

“Where it does become a danger, we would obviously have to close that lane down. Keep an eye out for crews. Whenever we start the OGFC repairs as well, we’ll be putting out traffic alerts about it,” Flood said.

MDOT said they want drivers to do their part and be alert on the interstate.



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