Mississippi Digital News

Ginger Rutland looks back at her NorCal journalism career

0
Booking.com



Beaver Seeds - Get Out and Grow Spring Sasquatch 300x250

She was a familiar face on TV screens in Northern California in the 1970s. Ginger Rutland is a twin, the youngest of four children. Her family moved to Sacramento when she was 4 years old. She attended McClatchy High School, but when her father who was working at McClellan Air Force Base was transferred to Germany, the family went too.Years later, after getting a history degree from Howard University, Ginger returned home and started working at KCRA 3. She was the station’s first African American female TV reporter.”I grew up in the 60s, I came of age in the 60s and I grew up watching the civil rights movement and I was quite inspired by the journalist I saw on television and I read in the newspapers and so I thought I want to be a journalist,” Rutland said.While Rutland told KCRA 3’s Brandi Cummings that she was treated well and said nothing happened to her because of her race, she recalls areas of NorCal that at that time she simply refused to go.”I do not want to go to Placer County or Nevada County or any of the rural areas with a Black cameraman. We were frankly afraid,” she said.While at KCRA, Ginger met and married her husband, who was working at the capitol. They have one daughter, named after Ginger’s mother.After nearly a decade, she moved on to work for a Bay Area TV station as their Capitol reporter. So she was able to continue living in Sacramento with her family. “I reported on Jerry Brown’s first incarnation as governor and I went to New Hampshire, when he ran for president, and I guess my biggest story there was the opening of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant,” Rutland said.She showed us the Emmy award she won for the story on the plant. Rutland shares the award with her husband, who became her producer. After a decade, the bureau closed and Rutland would say goodbye to TV news. She then landed a job on the editorial board at the Sacramento Bee. “I thought I was going to go to NBC, ABC, CBS and all those things. My goal was frankly to be the CBS correspondent in Paris and as I look back, I thought that was really not a good career move for me,” Rutland said. “I grew up in Sacramento, I knew Sacramento and my advantage for a bunch of reasons was that I knew this town really well. I think that was an asset as a reporter.”Now she enjoys spending time with her two grandsons and writing opinion articles in the paper. Rutland republished her mother’s memoir, ‘When We Were Colored’.”It’s a story about what it’s like to move from a fully segregated world to suddenly an integrated world,” she said.You can also add playwright to Ginger’s list of accomplishments. She turned the book into a play — it starred her niece, who portrayed her mother. To sum up her career in television, Rutland said, “It was a great ride. It was a great ride.”

She was a familiar face on TV screens in Northern California in the 1970s. Ginger Rutland is a twin, the youngest of four children. Her family moved to Sacramento when she was 4 years old.

She attended McClatchy High School, but when her father who was working at McClellan Air Force Base was transferred to Germany, the family went too.

Years later, after getting a history degree from Howard University, Ginger returned home and started working at KCRA 3. She was the station’s first African American female TV reporter.

“I grew up in the 60s, I came of age in the 60s and I grew up watching the civil rights movement and I was quite inspired by the journalist I saw on television and I read in the newspapers and so I thought I want to be a journalist,” Rutland said.

While Rutland told KCRA 3’s Brandi Cummings that she was treated well and said nothing happened to her because of her race, she recalls areas of NorCal that at that time she simply refused to go.

“I do not want to go to Placer County or Nevada County or any of the rural areas with a Black cameraman. We were frankly afraid,” she said.

While at KCRA, Ginger met and married her husband, who was working at the capitol. They have one daughter, named after Ginger’s mother.

After nearly a decade, she moved on to work for a Bay Area TV station as their Capitol reporter. So she was able to continue living in Sacramento with her family.

“I reported on Jerry Brown’s first incarnation as governor and I went to New Hampshire, when he ran for president, and I guess my biggest story there was the opening of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant,” Rutland said.

She showed us the Emmy award she won for the story on the plant. Rutland shares the award with her husband, who became her producer.

After a decade, the bureau closed and Rutland would say goodbye to TV news. She then landed a job on the editorial board at the Sacramento Bee.

“I thought I was going to go to NBC, ABC, CBS and all those things. My goal was frankly to be the CBS correspondent in Paris and as I look back, I thought that was really not a good career move for me,” Rutland said. “I grew up in Sacramento, I knew Sacramento and my advantage for a bunch of reasons was that I knew this town really well. I think that was an asset as a reporter.”

Now she enjoys spending time with her two grandsons and writing opinion articles in the paper.

Rutland republished her mother’s memoir, ‘When We Were Colored‘.

“It’s a story about what it’s like to move from a fully segregated world to suddenly an integrated world,” she said.

You can also add playwright to Ginger’s list of accomplishments. She turned the book into a play — it starred her niece, who portrayed her mother.

To sum up her career in television, Rutland said, “It was a great ride. It was a great ride.”



Source link

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.